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Part 15: What should we expect? Future climate projections






By Luisa Cristini, PhD, University of Hawaii at Manoa Note from the editor: This is the fifteenth and last in a series of blog entries that focused on introductory topics in climate dynamics and modeling, and served to provide insight into the current understanding of the science.] Given the increasing evidence of climate change, what [...]

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Melting from underneath






By Torben Stichel, PhD., University of Hawaii at Manoa The ongoing debate on global climate change tends to give the impression that there is nothing new on this front. Of course, the candidates and media outlets involved in the upcoming election for the presidency of the United States will again use this topic as a political [...]

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Part 4: The Land






Luisa Cristini, PhD, University of Hawaii at Manoa. [Note from the editor: This is the fourth in a series of blog entries that will focus on introductory topics in climate dynamics and modeling, and will be a great insight into the current understanding of the science.] Many characteristics of the climate are influenced by the [...]

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Part 3: What’s Hot About Ice?






By Luisa Cristini, PhD, University of Hawaii at Manoa. [Note from the editor: This is the third in a series of blog entries that will focus on introductory topics in climate dynamics and modeling, and will be a great insight into the current understanding of the science.] The cryosphere is the portion of the Earth’s [...]

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Part 2: The Ocean – Earth’s Climate Engine






By Luisa Cristini, PhD, University of Hawaii at Manoa [Note from the editor: This is the second in a series of blog entries that will focus on introductory topics in climate dynamics and modeling, and will be a great insight into the current understanding of the science.] Seventy-one percent of the Earth’s surface is covered [...]

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Climate Change Research: The Study of Ice Cores






Ice cores, drilled from the polar ice caps of Antarctica and Greenland most commonly, but also from places as diverse as Africa, Bolivia, China, Peru, Russia and even the United States are the most accurate means to proving a window into the paleoclimate record in Earth’s history, including past climatic and environmental conditions.  Drilling miles [...]

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